Skip to main content

DIY Phone Case/Pocket

I found this short video on a DIY paper phone case. It's sturdy enough to hold something as heavy as a smart phone (or multiple writing implements) but also light enough to include as part of your everyday journal carry. This origami item could be modified to suit any number of things.


Want to try some Origami? Click this origami paper affiliate link and you can help me out a little and get involved in a fantastic creative outlet.

Comments



Popular posts from this blog

How to use a streamlined monthly log workflow

A lot of bullet journalers like to keep things minimal, and I'm one of them. But this can pose problems, such as where do you put stuff if the minimalist design leaves very limited space? That's the intersection between design and technique: how you layout your journal vs how you actually use it. This is the second in a series on the amalgam of these two things. (see the first installment on a future log workflow ) In Ryder Carroll's introductory video you'll see a minimalist monthly spread. It's pretty much the monthly spread I still use today. So if you want to keep things simple, how do you this and still keep it functional enough to accommodate real life? Easy: short hand. In this monthly spread you'll notice my calendar printout in the upper right hand corner of the right page. Beneath that I put a task list for the month. This is a bird's eye view of the month. Nitty gritty tasks or multi-step tasks are handled elsewhere. The printout and task

Easiest collections for bullet journal

Several times I've seen a question about adding collections to the bullet journal. The question usually goes something like this: do you move to the next available page, skip some pages to make a collection at an expected place, or something else? It's common in my journal to end up with a blank page here and there. As far as I can tell, most people don't want to waste pages in their journal. Even in the 500 page journal I'm currently using I still try to avoid waste. And there's an easy way to deal with these intermittent blank pages. Since I index the content in my journal it's very convenient to simply record blank pages there. Later these blank pages can be converted into what ever I want. Most of the time they are turned into collections. This way my journal workflow is not interrupted and I still get to use every page. Easy. How do you manage collections? Comment here and be sure to subscribe!

Minimalist Follow Up Methods for Bullet Journal

We've all been there. Something is initiated, you have to contribute to it in some way, and then you have to wait. Maybe you have to wait for some information, or for something to be delivered, or for an event to take place, etc. You can't finish what you're working on until someone else does something. This where following up could significantly improve your situation - if you remembered to follow up in the first place. Let me offer some ideas on that. I use two methods to help me remember to follow up. Which method to be used depends on whether I'm working on a project with a deadline or if it's something else. One of the benefits of trying to keep things minimal is certain concepts can be used for multiple purposes. Here are two ideas already discussed on this blog. Following up: for projects with deadlines On a project with a deadline, stuff has to be done by a certain date and you've got skin in the game. For this sort of follow up I typically use a